Description

INSTANT DOWNLOAD COMPLETE TEST BANK WITH ANSWERS

 

 

Foodservice Management Principles and Practices 12th Edition By Monica Theis – Test Bank

 

 

Sample  Questions

 

CHAPTER REVIEW QUESTIONS

SELECTED WEB SITES

8
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

Learning Objectives

Following completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

0 describe how socioeconomic trends and demographic changes have and continue to affect the foodservice industry.
1 enumerate some of the current challenges facing the industry.
2 identify the three major categories of foodservices and list some sub-categories of each.

3 describe the contents and purpose of a mission statement.
4 discuss the systems approach to management.
5 draw the systems model to demonstrate an understanding of systems thinking.
6 describe how systems theory differs from earlier approaches to management.
7 identify the five characteristics that differentiate the four major types of foodservice systems in use in the United States today.

8 describe the identifying features, advantages and disadvantages of the conventional, commissary, ready-prepared, and assembly/serve foodservice systems.
9 identify the criteria that should be used to determine the most suitable system for a particular situation.

Learning Enhancement Activities

0 Take students on fieldtrips to foodservice facilities that employ each of the types of foodservice systems described in the chapter.
1 Have students debate the advantages and disadvantages of each of the foodservice systems. For example, have one team of students who represent conventional foodservice debate a team that represents cook-chill.

2 To illustrate systems theory, develop some scenarios that include a change in one part of the system. Have students discuss the impact of such a change on the other parts of the system.

3 Have students identify the scope of service of the campus foodservice operation.

4 In small groups have students write a mission statement for their ideal foodservice operation.

Test Questions

Multiple Choice

23 The primary function of an organization’s mission statement is to:

23 attract customers
24 motivate employees

25 promote profit sharing
26 guide decision making

Ans: D      Page 46

23 A collection of interrelated parts unified by design to obtain one or more objectives is best described by which of the following terms?

23 a social system

24 a subsystem

25 a system

26 dynamic homeostasis

9
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

Ans: C      Page 48

23 In systems theory the process of changing inputs into outputs is known as

23 dynamic equilibrium

24 homeostasis

25 equifinality

26 transformation

Ans: D      Page 49

23 An example of an output is:

23 bread for a bakery

24 fresh tomatoes for a catsup canner

25 pulp for a book publisher

26 seeds for a farmer

27 stainless steel for an equipment manufacturer

Ans: A      Page 50

23 An ultra-stable system may be described as having

23 homeostasis

24 wholism

25 entropy

26 synergy

Ans: C      Page 50

23 Which of the following is the primary reason that managers of conventional foodservices have made changes in the form in which foods are purchased?
23 to improve productivity

24 to improve quality of outputs

25 to reduce food cost

26 to reduce production time

Ans: D      Page 52

23 Advantages of utilizing a ready prepared foodservice system include:

23 avoids peaks and valleys of production

24 cost of equipment is generally low

25 provides close control over menu items

26 provides flexibility in menu planning

27 reduces energy costs

A.
1, 2, and 3
C.
1, 4, and 5
B.
1, 3, and 4
D.
1, 2, and 5
Ans: B
Page 55

10
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

23 Food is prepared in the main kitchen. Trays are assembled and sent from the main kitchen. This is called:

23 cafeteria-type service

24 centralized foodservice

25 convenience foodservice

26 scramble system

Ans: B      Page 55

23 Choose the statement that best describes the commissary foodservice system?

23 centralized production with highly automated equipment

24 decentralized production and centralized service

25 procurement of food that is completely processed

26 the type of foodservice found on military bases

Ans: A      Page 55

23 Which of the following types of foodservice operations is best suited to a commissary system?
23 operations where a large number of people must be served in one place

24 operations where service is close to production

25 operations with a large number of serving units

26 operations with unique food requirements

Ans: C      Page 56

23 Choose the phrase that best states the primary objective of the assembly/serve system?
23 a desire for individuality

24 minimize labor cost

25 serve rural healthcare facilities

26 suited to multiple serving units

Ans: B      Page 56

23 Which of the following is the key difference between ready prepared and conventional systems?
23 degree of processing of purchased foods

24 lag time between production and service

25 type of service system used

26 type of storage used for prepared food items

Ans: B      Page 58

11
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

True I False      (Circle the appropriate response.)

1.
T
F
An organization’s mission statement should be written after its

objectives have been developed.
Ans: F

Page 46
2.
T
F
The human relations theory of management developed following

research conducted by Elton Mayo.
Ans: T

Page 47
3.
T
F
Scientific management theory held that social and psychological

factors were important to worker satisfaction and productivity.
Ans: F

Page 47
4.
T
F
The human body may be thought of as a system.
Ans: T

Page 48
5.
T
F
Communication and decision making are linking processes in an

organizational system.
Ans: T

Page 50
6.
T
F
A foodservice organization is considered a closed system.
Ans: F

Page 50
7.
T
F
The term “equifinality” means that there is more than one way to

achieve desired goals.
Ans: T

Page 50
8.
T
F
Rethermalization is the process of quick freezing prepared foods.
Ans: F

Page 53
9.
T
F
Food cost is more likely to be higher in an assembly serve system.
Ans: T

Page 57
10.
T
F
A ready prepared foodservice system would be the best choice where

there is a shortage of skilled labor.
Ans: F

Page 58

12
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

Matching

(Match the part of the systems model with the term that belongs in this part of the system.)

1.
environment
A.
comment cards
2.
feedback
B.
contracts
3.
inputs

C.
decision making
4.
linking processes
D.
information
5.
outputs

E.
historical data
6.
transformations
F.
personnel satisfaction
7.
memory
G.
production
8.
controls
H.
suppliers
Answers:
1-H   Pages:
50

2-A
50

3-D
49

4-C
50

5-F
50

6-G
49

7-E
50

8-B
50

(Match the type of foodservice system with the appropriate description.)

1.
assembly serve
A.
no on-premise food production
2.
commissary

B.
place of preparation and service are separated
3.
conventional

C.
time and place of preparation and service are

not separated
4.
ready prepared
D.
time of preparation and service are separated
Answers:
1-A
Pages:
56-57

2-B

55-56

3-C

51-52

4-D

52-55

Short Answer I Essay (Answer the question completely and concisely in the space provided.)

13
Part 1: The Foundations—Chapter 2: The Systems Approach

23 Compare and contrast managerial effectiveness and efficiency. Give an example of each.

Key Points

23 effectiveness may be measured by how well the organization achieves its objectives over time

24 efficiency is a measure of achievement of short term objectives

Page 46

23 Diagram the campus foodservice using the systems model

Page 49

23 Discuss the unique aspects of quality control in each of the four foodservice systems. Key Points

23 conventional: quality control is of primary importance; standard of quality is achieved through selection of recipes, menus, and ingredients and close monitoring of production

24 commissary: only one unit to supervise rather than many; food safety and distribution are of concern in mass production; many areas of possible contamination; transport of food must be carefully monitored

25 ready prepared: one unit to supervise, no delivery off premise required, close control possible over production, bacteriological hazards possible, must carefully control time/temperature relationships

26 assembly serve: little control possible over food quality except in the selection of prepared items

Pages 51-59

14
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

CHAPTER 3

Food Safety

Chapter Overview

This chapter addresses the very serious and complex issue of food safety. An in-depth review of the status of food borne illness introduces the chapter and is followed by a review of basic food microbiology. These sections set the stage for discussions on employee health, personal hygiene and proper food handling. The chapter also reviews the relationship of regulations to food safety and introduces the food safety system known as HACCP.

Chapter Outline

INTRODUCTION

KEY CONCEPTS

FOODBORNE ILLNESS

Scope of the Problem: Incidence of Foodborne Illness

Costs Associated with Outbreaks of Foodborne Illness

THE ROLE OF THE FOOD MANAGER

CAUSES OF FOODBORNE ILLNESS

Hazards Inherent to Food

Hazards Introduced to Food by People and Practices

A SYSTEMS APPROACH TO FOOD SAFETY

Controls and Food Safety

FOOD SAFETY: An Integrated Program of HACCP and Prerequisite Programs

Prerequisite Programs: The Foundation of an Integrated Food Safety Program Prerequisite Programs and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND PERSONAL HYGIENE

Proper Attire

Personal Hygiene Habits

FLOW OF FOOD THROUGH THE FOODSERVICE OPERATION

Proper Food Handling

Potential Hazards in Production

HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT

MANAGING AN INTEGRATED FOOD SAFETY PROGRAM

ENFORCEMENT

15
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

SUMMARY

APPLICATION OF CHAPTER CONCEPTS

CRITICAL-THINKING QUESTIONS

REVIEW QUESTIONS

SELECTED WEB SITES

Learning Objectives

Following completion of this unit the student will be able to:

23 delineate the scope and severity of foodborne illness.

24 understand basic food microbiology as it relates to the risks associated with foodborne disease.
25 identify chemical and physical causes of foodborne illness.

26 design and implement prerequisite programs that can form the foundation of an integrated food safety program.
27 track and assess the flow of food through a foodservice operation.

28 identify and apply principles of safe food handling.

29 recognize hazards and their relationship to food safety.

30 interpret and comply with food safety regulations in the practice setting.

31 design and implement a hazard-based food safety system.

Learning Enhancement Activities

5888 Provide a recipe and have the students design a HACCP plan for the menu item.

5889 Present several examples of recent outbreaks of foodborne illness that have appeared in the popular press.

Have the students:

5888 identify causative organisms based on the information provided.

5889 discuss plans-of-correction to assure that a similar outbreak will not reoccur.

5890 Encourage students to observe food handling and personal hygiene in restaurants. Note good practices and those that may not meet industry or regulatory standards.

5891 Distribute food models in class. Have students identify hazards inherent to the food.

16
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

Test Questions

Multiple Choice

0 A primary reason why restaurants, popular with elderly customers, should be particularly concerned about food safety is because this population:
0.0 tends to eat out more than most customers

0.1 is identified as a highly susceptible population

0.2 has a tendency to take leftovers home

0.3 spends 50% of their food dollar at restaurants

Ans: B      Page 67

0 The temperature danger zone, as defined by the federal government is:

0 41 to 135 degrees

1 40 to 140 degrees

2 45 to 135 degrees

0 41 to 150 degrees

Ans: A      Pages 70, 83

0 The single most important measure to prevent the spread of staphylococci in a food service operation is to teach and monitor proper:
0 use of hair restraints

1 handwashing

2 temperature taking

3 thawing techniques

Ans:  B     Page 71

0 Which of the following is the best resource to consult for federal guidelines on proper time-temperature relationships in food preparation?
0 JCAHO manual

1 The Federal Register

2 Food Code

3 FDA Web Site

Ans: C      Pages 75, 82-84

0 Which is true regarding the Food Code?

0 it is the federal government’s best guidance on food safety

1 states are required by the USDA to adopt it as regulation

2 it is federal regulation

3 it applies only to on-site, non-commercial foodservice operations

Ans: A      Page 75

17
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

0 The best method to assure that poultry has been adequately cooked to reduce harmful microorganisms is to:
0.512 monitor time and temperature throughout the preparation process

0.513 make sure juices run clear

0.514 cook it for as long as the recipe indicates

0.515 squeeze the thigh meat, (it should be firm)

Ans: A      Page 83

0 The P.M. supervisor checks the refrigerator at 7:00 P.M. and finds a three-gallon stock pot full of beef tips in gravy leftover from the noon cafeteria serving line. The internal temperature is 75°F. The supervisor should:

0.0 blenderize the tips for tomorrow’s puree diets

0.1 use the tips immediately for late trays

0.2 dispose of the tips

0.3 portion the tips into 2-inch shallow pans and place in the refrigerator

Ans: C      Page 83

0 As part of a HACCP plan a dietary manager identifies quantifiable time and temperature standards for each phase of a recipe. These standards are examples of:
0 hazards

1 risks

2 critical limits

3 critical control points

Ans: C      Page 88

0 Starting a HACCP plan can be overwhelming especially in establishments with hundreds of recipes and complex production/service systems. Under these circumstances a good place to start HACCP plans would be with:

0 the most expensive and popular menu items

1 frozen, convenience products

2 recipes that include potentially hazardous ingredients

3 individually packaged bread products

Ans: C      Page 88

Ȁ⸀ĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀԀĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀ0 A cook prepares chicken according to a recipe. The recipe includes a CCP with a minimum end point temperature of 165° for 15 seconds. At the end of the specified baking time the product temperature is at 160°. Following principles of HACCP the next thing the cook should do is:

ĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀȀĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀ0 place the chicken on a steam table and bring the temperature up to 165°

ĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀȀĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀ1 enter the end point temperature into a computer data base

ĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀȀĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀ2 throw the chicken out

ĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀȀĀȀ⸀ĀᜀĀ∀ĠᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀĀᜀ3 follow corrective actions as established for this CCP

Ans: D      Page 88

18
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

True I False
(Circle the appropriate response.)
1.
T
F
Representatives from the CDC inspect foodservice operations for
compliance with sanitation regulations.
Ans: F

Page 66
2.
T
F
Foodservice employees, especially cooks, should be trained to detect
the presence of food pathogens by smelling and tasting the food prior to service.
Ans: F

Page 72
3.
T
F
The Food Code is federal law and must be adopted by state regulatory
agencies.

Ans: F

Page 75
4.
T
F
According to the Food Code, refrigerated foods should be held at or
below 41°F.

Ans: T

Page 83
5.
T
F
Thermometers need to be cleaned and sanitized after each use.
Ans: T

Page 84

19
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

Matching
(Match the letter of the one term that best corresponds to the following
statements.)

1.
A process step at which a preventive or
A. cross contamination

control measure can be applied that would

eliminate, prevent, or minimize a hazard.
B. foodborne illness

0 The transfer of harmful microorganisms from one item of food to another by means of a nonfood contact surface.

1 A disease that results from eating food that contains live pathogenic bacteria or other microorganisms.

2 An incident of foodborne illness, confirmed through laboratory analysis, that involves 2 or more people who eat a common food

0 flow of food

1 critical control point

2 outbreak

23 the path that food travels in a foodservice operation.

Answers:
1-D   Pages:
88

2-A
79

3-B
69

4-E
66

5-C
80

20
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 3: Food Safety

Short Answer I Essay (Answer the question completely and concisely in the space provided.)

23 What is the role of a foodservice manager in assuring the provision of safe food to all customers?

Key Points

23 design and implement an integrated food safety program

24 train, motivate and supervise staff

25 regularly monitor the facility and employees to ensure that standards are consistently met

26 stay current with issues, trends and regulatory changes related to food safety

Page 68

23 Describe what it is about the nature of some foods that contribute to the growth of bacteria.

Key Points

23 time and temperature

24 moisture

25 protein

26 acidity/pH

Page 70

23 Proper and frequent handwashing is the single-most important aspect of personal hygiene to prevent foodborne illness. Describe the procedure of double handwashing.

Key Points

23 use hot water

24 moisten hands and soap thoroughly & lather to elbow

25 use a brush to scrub nails & rinse

26 resoap & lather, using friction for 20 seconds

27 rinse thoroughly under running water

28 dry hands using single-service towels or hot air dryer

Page 79

21
Part 2: The Fundamentals—Chapter 4: Facility Sanitation and Worker Safety