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Introduction To International Disaster Management 3rd Edition by Damon P. Coppola – Test Bank

 

 

Sample  Questions

 

Damon Coppola: Introduction to International Disaster Management, 3rd Edition

Chapter 3: Risk and Vulnerability

 

 

  1. The likelihood component of risk is generally written as which of the following?

 

  1. Probability
  2. Frequency

*c. Both a and b

  1. Neither a nor b

 

  1. Which of the following illustrates the format in which a hazard probability would be reported?

 

  1. 6 times per year

*b. 0.76

  1. Both a and b
  2. Neither a nor b

 

  1. Qualitative analyses use which of the following to describe and compare risks?

 

  1. Numerical probabilities
  2. Maps
  3. Mitigation measures

*d. Defined terms

 

  1. Which of the following is not one of the three factors that are normally examined in determining the consequence component of hazard risk?

 

*a. Homelessness

  1. Injuries
  2. Damages
  3. Fatalities

 

  1. Which of the following have been described as “those first order consequences which occur immediately after an event, such as the deaths and damage caused by the throwing down of buildings in an earthquake”?

 

*a. Direct losses

  1. Indirect losses
  2. Tangible losses
  3. Intangible losses

 

  1. Loss of cultural heritage is an example of which of the following?

 

  1. Indirect losses
  2. Direct losses
  3. Tangible losses

*d. Intangible losses

 

  1. “55 people killed” is an example of which of the following?

 

  1. Quantitative representation of likelihood
  2. Qualitative representation of likelihood

*c. Quantitative representation of consequence

  1. Qualitative representation of consequence

 

  1. Which of the following is probably the most significant cause of trends relating to increasing disaster consequences?

 

  1. Changes in climate patterns
  2. Changes in the attributes of a hazard

*c. Changes in human activities

  1. None of the above

 

  1. Depth of hazard analysis performed normally depends upon three factors. Which of the following is not one of those factors?

 

  1. The amount of time and money available

*b. The experience of the analysis team

  1. The seriousness of the risk
  2. The complexity of the risk

 

  1. Historical incidence of disasters in not necessarily helpful in the analysis of which of the following?

 

*a. Extremely rare hazards

  1. Earthquakes
  2. Hazards that affect small communities
  3. Annual hazards

 

  1. Losses to structure use and function are often considered when performing which of the following?

 

*a. Full damage consequence analysis

  1. Abbreviated consequence analysis
  2. Business consequence analysis
  3. None of the above

 

  1. Risk evaluation is conducted for which of the following reasons?

 

  1. To determine hazard likelihood
  2. To determine hazard consequence

*c. To determine the relative seriousness of a community’s hazard risks

  1. All of the above

 

  1. Disaster managers performing a risk evaluation can record their findings in a concise format known as which of the following?

 

  1. Risk catalog
  2. Risk metric
  3. Risk matrix

*d. Risk register

 

  1. There are three factors that together influence the determination of risk acceptability. Which of the following is not one of those factors?

 

*a. Institutional factors

  1. Personal factors
  2. Political/social factors
  3. Economic factors

 

  1. Which of the following is a common injustice seen in the disaster management process?
  2. Those with money and vested interests can influence the process of determining the acceptability of risk.
  3. Setting a dollar figure on a human life is considered by many to be unethical and unconscionable.
  4. Risk management is usually an undemocratic process, as those who may be harmed are not identified or asked if the danger is acceptable to them.

*d. All of the above

 

  1. Which of the following measures the individual, societal, political, and cultural factors that increase or decrease a people’s propensity to incur harm or damage as a result of a specific hazard?

 

  1. Physical vulnerability
  2. Economic vulnerability

*c. Social vulnerability

  1. Environmental vulnerability

 

  1. Education and government are components of a country’s:

 

*a. Social profile

  1. Physical profile
  2. Environmental profile
  3. Economic profile

 

  1. The study of why people fear the things they do is which of the following?

 

  1. Fear management
  2. Expectations management
  3. Mitigation science

*d. Risk perception

 

  1. Which of the following must disaster managers consider when scoping social vulnerability?

 

  1. Topograpy
  2. Climate
  3. Critical infrastructure

*d. None of the above

 

  1. Which of the following would typically decrease public fear of a hazard?

 

*a. It is not globally catastrophic

  1. It is not preventable
  2. It is not equitable
  3. It is not observable

 

  1. Which of the following is a factor of how small or great the consequences would be should the hazard manifest?

 

  1. Exposure

*b. Vulnerability

  1. Social profile
  2. Propensity

 

  1. Disaster-causing hazards usually result in a greater total number of injuries and fatalities over the course of each year than more common hazards encountered on the individual level.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. Frequency refers to the number of times an event will occur within an established sample size over a specific period of time.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. For many personal risks, such as those associated with many recreational sports like skiing, individuals are given the freedom to decide the degree to which they will reduce their risk exposure.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. A dollar value cannot be assigned to the intangible losses of a disaster.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. The benefits that result in the aftermath of disasters, like jobs created and greater public recognition of risk, are commonly included in the assessment of hazard consequence.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. De manifestis risk levels are risk levels below which we no longer need to worry about a hazard risk.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. Several analyses may need to be performed on a single hazard if there is a range of possible intensities that may be exhibited by the hazard.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. If a risk can be eliminated in a cost-effective manner, there is no reason why a risk manager should not eliminate it.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. Disasters tend to exhibit the same consequences regardless of when in the day they occur.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. Qualitative analysis gives a specific data point to describe a hazard.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. Benefit-cost analyses are probably the most widely used and widely accepted method by which risks and alternatives are evaluated for acceptability.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. People are affected by visible vulnerability.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. A strong economic standing indicates that a country will protect itself from the likelihood and consequence of disasters.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. People are willing to accept voluntary risks more than involuntary risks.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. New risks are perceived to be much scarier than old risks.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. The term “safe” implies that risk has been eliminated.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. There is a direct link between a healthy and productive natural environment and disaster resilience.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. Modeling techniques can be used to estimate disaster consequences of rare hazards.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. A country’s physical profile is considered to be a collective examination of its geography, infrastructure, and political climate.

 

  1. True

*b. False

 

  1. The ways in which hazard risk is presented or reported can have a great influence on the way that people perceive the hazard.

 

*a. True

  1. False

 

  1. Once quantitative figures have been calculated for both the likelihood and consequence components of risk, the disaster manager can begin the process of determining the qualitative values assigned to the likelihood and consequence for each hazard.

 

*a. True

  1. False