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INSTANT DOWNLOAD COMPLETE TEST BANK WITH ANSWERS

 

 

Managment Occupation Health And Safety 5th Edition by Kevin Kelloway  – Test Bank

 

 

Sample  Questions

 

Chapter 3-Workers’ Compensation

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. In general, if a worker sustains an injury on the job and is unable to work due to that injury what will Workers’ Compensation provide?
a. that the injured worker receives only first-aid treatment
b. that the injured worker receives benefits and remains at home recuperating until he or she can properly function at his or her job
c. that the injured worker receives proper health care coverage for injuries sustained
d. a temporary replacement for the injured worker

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 52

 

  1. The Workers’ Compensation Act retains which of the following principles?
a. It provides collective liability for employers.
b. It provides workers with compensation depending on the financial condition of the employer.
c. It is a system that allows for recourse to the courts.
d. It provides compensation based on organizational earnings.

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 53

 

  1. All of the following are regulations and responsibilities of WCBs EXCEPT?
a. The injured worker will receive payment while off work and will have all medical bills paid if the injury happened at work and because of work.
b. The injured worker will receive a pension if the disability is, or becomes, permanent.
c. The injured worker will receive benefits only if he or she cannot earn the same amount of money earned prior to the incident.
d. The injured worker will receive benefits if he or she is affected by an industrial disease.

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 54

 

  1. WCB works under which of the following system of compensation?
a. Industries are classified according to their number of employees regardless of how much the organization makes in revenue.
b. Is a system based on compulsory and collective liability.
c. Each employer is liable for assessment irrespective of the cost of injuries sustained by its workers.
d. Is a system based on compulsory and individual liability.

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 55

  1. What do WCB benefits include?
a. health care–related costs up to a maximum amount
b. lost time wages and possible pension
c. Ministry of Labour orders
d. re-training for a job selected by the WCB

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 57

 

  1. What is a main social goal of workers’ compensation?
a. to provide services intended to prevent injuries
b. to focus on paying a worker for his or her losses
c. to reduce the hardship of a work-related injury and the associated court costs
d. to help families cope with an injured family member

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 59-60

 

  1. What are the three types of WCB rehabilitation?
a. vocational, physical, and retraining
b. physical, retraining, and social
c. vocational, physical, and social
d retraining, medical, and social

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 61

 

  1. All of the following are examples of occupational diseases EXCEPT?
a. various cancers
b. repetitive strain
c. allergic reactions to workplace materials
d. skin diseases

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 61-62

 

  1. Which of the following is FALSE?
a. The Meredith Report, established in 1914, was the first workers’ compensation act that provided a trade-off where workers give up their right to sue in exchange for compensation benefits.
b. WCB is based on a no-fault insurance-based system.
c. Employees “fund” the entire workers’ compensation system.
d. compensation is based on loss of organizational earnings

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 53-54

  1. Which is NOT a benefit of WCB coverage?
a. protection from lawsuits for employers
b. wage loss compensation for injured workers or their dependants
c. the right to an appeal if the worker doesn’t agree with a WCB decision
d. the right to sue if the worker doesn’t like the WCB decision

 

ANS: d

PTS: 1

REF: p. 54

 

  1. In Canada, what are WCB lost-time benefits?
a. They are based on a percentage of the workers’ earning.
b. They are 55% of the workers’ yearly earnings.
c. They are topped up by the employer.
d. They are 95% of the workers’ weekly earnings.

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 57

 

  1. What is the purposed of the WCB experience rating system?
a. to provide protection from lawsuits
b. to offer an incentive to employees to get back to work faster
c. to offer an incentive to employers to reduce injuries
d. a and b

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 63

 

  1. Which of the following BEST describes OH&S legislation and WCB legislation?
a. They were enacted at the same time.
b. They are completely different pieces of legislation.
c. They are under the jurisdiction of the Canadian federal government.
d. They perform the safe functions.

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 57

  1. Which of the following funds safety associations?
a. the provincial WCB
b. employer associations
c. union associations
d. b and c

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 59

 

  1. When reporting workplace injuries, the employer report is designed to collect all the following information EXCEPT?
a. the nature of the employment relationship
b. the compensation the employee expects to receive
c. the nature of the incident and injury
d. the extent of time loss and medical treatment

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 65

 

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Workers’ compensation is a form of insurance that is governed by an act of parliament for the purpose of helping workers who are injured on the job return to work.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 52

 

  1. The WCBs use an experience rating designed to ensure workers are compensated fairly.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 55, 57, 63

 

  1. Incidents caused by employer negligence are not covered by WCB.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 57

 

  1. WCB Premium = (Base rate ± Experience rating adjustment) × Assessable earnings/100.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 53

 

  1. The WCB compensation system is one of compulsory and collective liability.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 55

 

  1. In the event of the death of a worker, the dependants will be entitled to benefits.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 54

 

  1. Loss of functional capacity is the limit of ability or dexterity depending on the seriousness of an injury.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 58-59

 

  1. Experience rating is not a strong incentive to employers to reduce injuries and to return workers to their jobs as early as possible.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 63-64

 

  1. The adjudication of stress claims is currently receiving a great deal of attention from all insurance parties.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 62

 

  1. Employer disability costs are reflected in increased premiums and assessment rates and flexible guidelines for what constitutes a compensable disorder.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 63

 

  1. Social rehabilitations are the psychological and practical services that help workers with severe disabilities cope with daily life.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 61

 

  1. Employers are obligated to identify suitable employment consistent with the individual’s abilities and, where possible, to ensure a return to pre-injury earnings.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF 59-61

 

  1. Vocational rehabilitations are the steps undertaken to help injured workers return to their place of employment or find similar or suitable work elsewhere.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 61

 

  1. Physical rehabilitations are the steps taken to restore, whether fully or partially, the worker’s physical, emotional, and social function.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 61

 

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Discuss the challenges associated with compensating employees with psychological conditions and illnesses.

 

ANS:

HRMs must keep current on the issues, laws, and practices concerning workplace stress. It is important to educate managers and employees on the organization’s disability coverage. Mental stress resulting in a mental condition is seldom compensated by WCBs (refer to exercise 1 in the textbook, page 71). Employees with non-occupational illnesses or injuries may receive short-term and long-term disability coverage if the company provides these benefits (i.e., private rate-shared plans). Some benefits may be claimed through employment insurance. The HRM should clarify the organization’s disability benefits, procedures, related health programs, and related return-to-work policies with the employee.

 

The HRM will want to identify the problems and health concerns immediately. Workplace or job stress occurs when the requirements of the job (working conditions) do not match the capabilities and resources of the employee (worker characteristics). The NIOSH model described in the text identifies the following major categories of workplace stressors: workload and work pace, role stressors, career concerns, work scheduling, interpersonal relations, and job content and control. It is the individual’s appraisal of the stressors that causes individual stress and possible strain, which leads to increased risk of mental and physical health. It is difficult to define a direct causal effect with the workplace. This may be a case of chronic stress that is the result of a cumulative buildup of pressures over a long time.

 

The causes of strain may be due to a variety of factors, one of which may or may not be the workplace. Often, chronic stress is difficult to assess. It is important for the HRM to find and identify the causative factors (stressors) causing the stress. Questions that can be asked are, What are the psychological barriers to the employee’s ability to work (i.e., conflict, change, work schedule, work demands, or personal and family issues)? What are some realistic solutions to the health issues?

 

A preventive integrative approach to managing stress in the workplace would encourage the reduction of stressors in the workplace as well as the recognition and management of occupational stress and strain using both organizational and individual primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions. Immediate interventions and using an interdisciplinary team approach involving health care professionals, management, and supervisors is important.

 

The focus should be on organizational and individual primary interventions that involve the reduction or removal of actual stressors such as learning the causes of workplace stress, reducing high job demands, increasing control over decisions, providing job variety and flexibility, clarifying role expectations, ensuring the workload and schedule are compatible with the worker’s capabilities and resources, and supporting individual strategies. The HRM should focus on education and preventing incidents or health problems. Focusing on minimizing negative outcomes once a person is feeling stress can include secondary and tertiary interventions such as stress management, nutrition, relaxation, exercise, and employee assistance programs.

 

The HRM should gather sufficient medical evidence from a physician and/or registered psychologist diagnosing the health issue immediately. The HRM will need to communicate regularly with the employee about the details of his or her disability and support the most appropriate, effective, timely, and efficient treatment.

 

Usually the HRM would encourage the employee to access an employee assistance program and set up other supports to allow the employee to stay connected to the workplace (i.e., reduced hours, modified and light duty, changing departments, receiving counselling support, and attending a stress management program), depending on the details of the problem.

 

Support, cooperation, and education from staff at all levels of the company as well as health care professionals and insurance companies is important. HRMs should create data systems to review and identify absenteeism, disability management practices and policies, trends, health costs, health and safety issues, and workplace issues, as well as measure improvements.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 59, 61, 62

 

  1. Write the WCB formula used to calculate the premium an employer pays to WCB.

 

ANS:

Premium = (Base rate ± Experience rating adjustment) × Assessable earnings

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 73

NOT: This formula is not in the text but can be found in the appendix.

 

  1. Describe the roles and responsibilities of the WCB today. Give an example of a WCB occupational health and safety prevention or public relation project in your jurisdiction.

 

ANS:

The Workers’ Compensation Board system today is one that retains the earlier principles of compulsory and collective liability and wage replacement with an expanded mandate to include vocational rehabilitation, health care, prevention, training, and public awareness. The Workers’ Compensation Board of BC provides extensive audio-visual and written publications for use online, in workplaces, in education institutions, and in media.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 54, 59

 

  1. List and define the three types of rehabilitation.

 

ANS:

  1. a) Vocational rehabilitation: refers to the steps undertaken by WCBs to help injured workers return to their place of employment or find similar or suitable work elsewhere. Placement services, vocational testing, and retraining or training may all be part of this process.
  2. b) Physical rehabilitation: refers to the steps taken to restore, fully or partially, the worker’s physical function.
  3. c) Social rehabilitation refers to the psychological and practical services that help workers with severe disabilities cope with daily life (e.g., assistance with cooking, bathing, and household chores).

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 60-61

 

  1. Discuss the employer reporting requirements for all workplace injuries to the Workers’ Compensation Board.

 

ANS:

The employer report is designed to collect information about: the nature of the employment relationship, the employee’s salary and hours of work, the nature of the incident and injury, and the extent of time loss and medical treatment.   These elements will determine whether the employee is eligible for compensation and, if so, the amount and duration of this compensation.

 

Employees are also required to report to the WCB if they want to open a claim for compensation.  Employees should be encouraged to file a report, even for minor injuries, in case a seemingly minor injury becomes more serious later on.

 

Refer to Figure 3.1 and Figure 3.2 for examples of employer and worker incident reports.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 65

 

PROBLEM

 

  1. Who shoulders the costs of disability in the workplace?

 

ANS:

The direct costs of disability are carried by

  • Individuals and families
  • Employers
  • Employer-paid benefits (e.g., LTD, WCB, sick leave, medical insurance, pensions)
  • Publicly funded benefits (e.g., welfare/social services, medical costs, provincial and federal disability allowances, financial institutions [disability insurance on mortgage, credit cards, loans, etc.])

 

Additional disability management resources include the following:

 

  • National Institute of Disability Management and Research

http://www.nidmar.ca/index.asp

  • Workplace Disability Management

http://www.whscc.nb.ca/docs/RTWBook_e.pdf

  • Case Studies on Disability Management

http://www.nidmar.ca/rehadat/rehadat_database/rehadat_database.asp

  • Columbia Health Centres and LifeMark Health

http://www.lifemark.ca/AboutColumbia.aspx

http://www.lifemark.ca/Default.aspx

  • Health Resource Centre

http://www.networc.com

  • Solareh

http://www.solareh.com/can-en/gestion.php

  • Official Disability Guidelines

http://www.disabilitydurations.com

PTS: 1

REF: p. 54-59

 

Chapter 5-Physical Agents

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The human hearing response is conditional on which of the following three characteristics?
a. duration, standards, and loudness
b. loudness, duration, and level
c. frequency, standards, and level
d. frequency, duration, and loudness

 

ANS: d

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123

 

  1. In which three ways can noise affect humans?
a. cognitively, sensorineurally, and sociologically
b. sociologically, psychologically, and sensorineurally
c. through physiological damage, physiological effects, and psychological effects
d. physiologically, sociologically, and cognitively

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 124-125

 

  1. What are the two basic types of physiological damage that can create hearing loss?
a. conductive and permanent
b. sensorineural and nerve deafness
c. conductive and sensorineural
d. irreversible and conductive

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 124

 

  1. The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety suggests that a workplace might be too noisy if which of the following is true?
a. In the workplace, employees have to raise their voices to be understood.
b. Employees have chronic ear infections.
c. Individuals who have worked in the workplace for years have a general feeling of fatigue.
d. There are a number of employees with hearing problems.

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. Which one is NOT a health effect of whole body vibration?
a. inhibition of muscular reflexes
b. sore joints
c. blurred vision
d.  shortness of breath

 

ANS: d

PTS: 1

REF: p. 130

 

  1. If workers are at risk of heat-related disorders, what are employers required to do?
a. conduct a heat stress assessment
b. adjust work-rest schedules to reduce exposure
c. send everyone home if the workplace is too hot
d. a and b

 

ANS: d

PTS: 1

REF: p. 132

 

  1. If an employee reports tingling in the fingers, loss of sensation in the fingers, and loss of grip strength they may be suffering from?
a. hand-arm vibration syndrome
b. thermal stress
c. hyperreflexia
d. segmental vibration

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 130

 

  1. Hearing loss results from exposure to sound levels at or above what amount for extended periods of time?
a. 55-60dB(A)
b. 65-75dB(A)
c. 85-90dB(A)
d. 97-105 dB(A)

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a heat-related illness?
a. heat stroke
b. heat exhaustion
c. hypothermia
d. heat hyperpyrexia

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 132

 

  1. Types of non-ionizing radiation include all of the following EXCEPT which one?
a. ultraviolet radiation
b. x-rays
c. radio waves
d. microwave radiation

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 134

 

  1. Which of the following are involved in thermal stress conditions?
a. wind chill ratings
b. hot temperature extremes
c. usually high humidity
d. b and c

 

ANS: d

PTS: 1

REF: p. 131

 

  1. What is the maximum allowable noise exposure level at the federal level?
a. 90 dB(A)
b. 87 dB(A)
c. 80 dB(A)
d. 75 dB(A)

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. Cold-related illnesses include all of the following EXCEPT?
a. hypothermia
b. frostbite
c. hyperthermia
d.  chilblains

 

ANS: c

PTS: 1

REF: p. 132

 

  1. What happens when you increase the dB(A) by 3?
a. The sound pressure level is doubled.
b. The sound pressure level is reduced by 30.
c. The sound pressure level is increased 300%.
d. The sound pressure level is tripled.

 

ANS: a

PTS: 1

REF: p. 125

 

  1. Which of the following can emit radiation?
a. air conditioning units
b. microwave ovens
c. high-vibration punch presses
d. jack hammers

 

ANS: b

PTS: 1

REF: p. 133-134

 

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Examples of physical agents include noise, vibration, radiation, and extremes in temperature.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123

 

  1. Physical agents are hazards that are created by any one, or any combination of, a very large number of physical reactions.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123

 

  1. The eye is the primary organ at risk from non-ionizing radiation.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 134

  1. Sound that we cannot hear can possibly cause hearing damage.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123

 

  1. The term “threshold of hearing” refers to the envelope or range of sound that the human ear can perceive or hear.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123

 

  1. Segmental vibration effects are caused by using vibrating tools.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 129

 

  1. The two basic classes of hearing protection available are earplugs and earmuffs.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 129

 

  1. British Columbia uses a noise standard of 85 dB(A) or 8 hours and a peak noise level of 140 dB(A).

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. All provinces except Quebec use 85 dB(A) as a noise standard.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. A dosimeter is an instrument used to determine the sensitivity of a person’s hearing or degree of hearing loss.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 127

 

  1. The process for noise control follows source-path-human strategies.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 127

 

  1. The BEST method to control noise is to use personal protective equipment.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 127-128

 

  1. Noise control approaches include job rotation, relocation, isolation, automation, rest periods, and site design.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 129

 

  1. Vibration refers to the oscillating motion of a particle or body moving about a reference position.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 129

 

  1. An indication of exposure to excessive noise levels at work is ringing in the ears (tinnitus).

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 125

 

  1. Thermodynamic theory shows that temperature flows from the high point to the low point. Thus in hot climates, heat will be absorbed by the body, making the person feel hot.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 131

 

  1. In cold climates, heat will flow from the body into the surrounding environment, thereby making the person feel cold.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 131

 

  1. Convection heat transfer occurs when two surfaces are in contact.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 132

 

  1. Radiation occurs when energy is transmitted by electromagnetic waves.

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 133

 

  1. The body core temperature is 35° to 40.5° C, with “normal” being 39°C.

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 132

 

  1. A normal conversation noise level is approximately 85dB(A).

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. A normal conversation noise level is approximately 55dB(A).

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. The exchange rate in most provinces for noise calculations is 5 dB(A).

 

ANS: F

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

  1. The exchange rate in most provinces for noise calculations is 3 dB(A).

 

ANS: T

PTS: 1

REF: p. 126

 

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Describe the legal steps an employer/HRM must take to control hazardous noise in the workplace. What is the most effective noise control method?

 

ANS:

An employer/HRM will want to use the source-path-human strategies to control hazardous noise in the workplace. The best method of dealing with noise in the workplace is to reduce noise at the source. If a worker is exposed to noise above the legal noise exposure limit, the employer must, perhaps with the help of experts, investigate and implement engineered noise-control options to reduce the noise exposure of workers below the recommended exposure limits if possible. If it is not possible to reduce noise levels, the employer must reduce noise exposure to the lowest level possible, post warning signs in the noise hazard areas (workers in a posted noise hazard area must wear hearing protection), give affected workers hearing protection that meets the legal standards, and ensure that hearing protection is worn effectively in noise hazard areas. This last strategy of using personal protective equipment is less costly but not always the most effective.

 

PTS: 1

REF: 127-129

 

  1. Describe four important facts about physical agents in the workplace. Give an example of each of these facts.

 

ANS:

  1. a) Physical agents are present in unexpected places (e.g., high school music rooms) and activities (e.g., iPods, concerts).
  2. b) Exposure to some physical agents may be inherent (professional musician).
  3. c) Legislative standards are maximum tolerances, and noise-induced hearing loss can occur below this exposure level (the length of exposure is as critical as the loudness; continuous noise is more damaging than a few minutes’ exposure).
  4. d) Issues are complex and solutions have to be evaluated for the risks they introduce to the environment.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123-135

 

  1. If workers are at risk of heat-related disorders, what obligations do employers have to ensure that the workers are safe from the dangers of heat exposure?

 

ANS:

  • Conduct a heat stress assessment.
  • Implement engineering controls to reduce the level of heat.
  • Adjust work-rest schedules to reduce exposure.
  • Provide personal protective equipment.
  • Ensure cool drinking water is accessible near the worksite.
  • Limit exposure through work rotation.
  • Install fans or air conditioning.
  • Allow time to acclimatize.
  • Provide drinking water.
  • Support the use of sun hats, sunscreen, and eye protection.

 

Preventing Heat Stress at Work is available at the Workers’ Compensation Board of BC at http://www.worksafebc.com/publications.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 131-133

 

  1. Describe several factors an employer/HRM would take into account in conducting a cost-benefit analysis to support an occupational health and safety program or a hearing conservation program that would reduce employees’ exposure to hazardous physical agents.

 

ANS:

Direct and indirect costs include equipment, training incident investigation, damage, replacement, and production costs. Other costs can include unhealthy behaviour, work stoppages and strikes, negative publicity after a death or serious public health problem, employee retention, emotional impact, and increased WCB insurance premiums.

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 127-128

 

 

PROBLEM

 

  1. The first step in dealing with noise is to determine if the hazard exists at all. How can an HRM know if employees are exposed to hazardous noise? What is the best hearing protection for work that takes place in hazardous noise environments?

 

ANS:

In BC, an employer must ensure that workers are not exposed to noise levels above either of the following exposure limits: 85 dB(A) Lex daily noise exposure level and 140 dB(A) peak sound level for an eight-hour continuous period without hearing protection. These legislated standards vary slightly throughout the provinces and territories (refer to Table 5.1) and must be viewed as the maximum allowable tolerances, not as a safe level of noise exposure, as hearing loss can occur below the legislated exposure level. Another factor to consider is how long the individual is exposed to potentially hazardous noise (i.e., exposure to noise on the edge of safe limits can cause hearing damage if ongoing over a long time; for example, a kitchen blender, at 86Db). The hazard noise poses is dependent on three main factors: intensity (loudness), frequency (pitch), and duration (time). The WorkSafe BC Publication How Do I Know If I Am Exposed to Noise http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/noise_exposure_handout.pdf describes and gives examples of various combinations of noise levels and durations and how they all pose the same risk to an exposed worker’s hearing. A noise-level assessment should be conducted by the employer for all noise-exposed job classifications, and warning signs should be immediately posted stating that hearing protection is required until a more formal hearing conservation program is implemented. When noise exceeds regulated limits, BC employers must have an effective noise control and hearing conservation program.

 

There is no single hearing protector appropriate for everyone. The criteria to consider include the worker’s noise exposure level, hearing ability of the worker, use of other personal protective equipment, temperature and climate, communication demands on the worker, and physical constraints of the worker or work activity.

 

Link to the Workers’ Compensation Board of BC (WorkSafe BC) website (http://www.worksafebc.com/publications/health_and_safety/by_topic/assets/pdf/hear_for_good.pdf) for the following publication: Hear for Good: Preventing Exposure at Work

  • Selecting Hearing Protection Poster (explains what type of hearing protection should be used in different circumstances) http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/hearingposter.pdf
  • Hearing Protection Is for Everyone

http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/hearing_protection_everyone.pdf

 

  • Hearing Protection Checklist

http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/hp_program_checklist.pdf

 

  • Hearing Protection selection criteria

http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/criteria_hearing_protection_selection.pdf

 

  • Noise Awareness Websites

http://www2.worksafebc.com/pdfs/hearing/noise_awareness_websites.pdf

 

PTS: 1

REF: p. 123-128