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Pediatric Nursing An Introductory Text 10th Edition By Price – Test Bank
 
Sample  Questions

 

Price: Pediatric Nursing, 10th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 1: Child Health Evolution

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. In the Middle Ages:
a. Adolescence emerged as a separate phase of life
b. A child was considered an adult by age 7
c. Childhood became a separate phase of life
d. The average life span was about 40 years

 

 

ANS:   B

A child was considered an adult by age 7. The average life span was only 30 years. Childhood became a separate phase of life after the work of Erickson and Piaget. Adolescence did not emerge as a separate phase of life until child labor laws were passed.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 1             OBJ:    2

TOP:    Evolution of Child Health                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Mothers were taught the importance of pure milk and its preparation by:
a. Abraham Jacobi
b. Lillian Wald
c. Jean Piaget
d. Florence Kelley

 

 

ANS:   A

Abraham Jacobi is considered the “father of pediatrics.” He established milk stations where mothers could bring their children for treatment. The mothers were also taught the importance of pure milk and its preparation.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 1             OBJ:    2

TOP:    Evolution of Child Health                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC:   NCLEX: N/A

 

  1. The establishment of the Medicare system of payment for hospital stays:
a. Had no impact on children’s health
b. Led to shorter hospital stays for acutely ill children
c. Decreased the need for discharge teaching
d. Eliminated the need for home health care

 

 

ANS:   B

The Medicare system of payment had an enormous impact on the rest of the insurance industry. Other insurance companies developed prospective payments plans of their own. The need for discharge teaching and home health care increased as a result of shorter hospital stays.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 4             OBJ:    4

TOP:    Healthcare Today                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

 

  1. Mrs. Lee, a Chinese American woman, brought her 5-year-old daughter to the clinic following a minor injury to the child’s leg. She talked freely with the female nurse while the nurse completed the health history and assessed vital signs. The nurse left the room to care for other patients. The physician, a male, examined the child with the mother present. He noticed that Mrs. Lee was uncommunicative and would not maintain eye contact. The nurse understands that Mrs. Lee’s response to the physician was related to the fact that:
a. Mrs. Lee did not understand the physician
b. Mrs. Lee injured her child and is afraid she will be reported to the authorities
c. Mrs. Lee is uncomfortable with male health care workers because of her culture
d. Mrs. Lee plans to see a traditional healer after consulting with the physician

 

 

ANS:   C

Mrs. Lee talked freely with the nurse during the assessment. There is insufficient information to suspect abuse. Chinese American clients may consider eye contact impolite. Chinese American women may be very uncomfortable about being examined by a male health care worker. Traditional Chinese healers are usually sought before seeking Western medicine.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 7             OBJ:    7

TOP:    Cultural Considerations                     KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Your pediatric patient is about to be discharged home. The child will be taking prescription medications on a regular basis. The parent uses herbal supplements and wishes to administer these to the child. You explain to the parent that herbal supplements:
a. Do not provide any benefit to the patient and are harmless
b. Can cause serious interactions with some prescription medications
c. Can be administered in excess of the recommended dosage
d. Are ineffective and are only used by the uninformed

 

 

ANS:   B

Herbal supplements can provide benefit but should never be considered harmless. Herbals have been documented to cause significant and harmful side effects with prescription drugs. Exceeding dosage is not recommended. Herbal supplements have been proven effective for some ailments and may be used in cultural rituals that are meaningful to the client.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Pages 8-9        OBJ:    7

TOP:    Complementary and Alternative Medicine

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. Complementary medicine is:
a. Only used when all other measures have been exhausted
b. Reimbursed by most insurance companies
c. Used in place of traditional medicine
d. Advocated by many cultural beliefs

 

 

ANS:   D

Complementary medicine is used with traditional or conventional therapy. It is not considered a last resort. It is not reimbursed by most insurance companies. Many cultural beliefs promote the use of complementary therapy.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 8             OBJ:    7

TOP:    Complementary and Alternative Medicine

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. A mother inquires about health insurance while visiting your clinic. She states that her income is too high for her to be eligible for Medicare, but too low to afford health insurance. You explain that she may be eligible to receive assistance from the:
a. The Division of Maternal and Child Health
b. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
c. WIC
d. The State Children’s Health Insurance Program

 

 

ANS:   D

The State Children’s Health Insurance Program has expanded coverage to many uninsured children ineligible for Medicaid. The division of Maternal and Child Health does not provide insurance. HIPAA protects privacy; WIC is a supplemental food program.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 2             OBJ:    2

TOP:    Government Programs                       KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

 

  1. The prevalence of chronic health conditions in children is:
a. Decreasing as a result of advances in health care and treatment
b. Increasing as a result of advances in health care and treatment
c. Increasing as a result of the improved survival of premature infants
d. Decreasing as a result of decreased incidence of childhood injury

 

 

ANS:   B

The prevalence of chronic health conditions in children is increasing as a result of advanced care and treatment. The increased number of surviving premature infants has increased the number of children with chronic conditions. The number of children who survive childhood injury has increased, leading to increased numbers of disabled children.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 3             OBJ:    3

TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Infant mortality in the United States is:
a. The lowest in the world
b. Improved because the United States has a national health insurance program
c. Highest among non-Hispanic, African-American mothers
d. Not related to maternal complications

 

 

ANS:   C

Infant mortality in the United States is highest among non-Hispanic, African-American mothers. The United States does not have the lowest infant mortality rate in the world. The United States does not have a national insurance program. Infant mortality is related to maternal complications.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 2             OBJ:    3

TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. In a terrorist attack, the most likely candidate for a bacterial agent release is:
a. Ricin
b. Sarin
c. Anthrax
d. Smallpox

 

 

ANS:   C

Anthrax is the most likely bacterial agent. Ricin is a toxin, sarin is a chemical agent, and smallpox is viral.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 5-6        OBJ:    5

TOP:    Emergency Preparedness                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. Nursing care of children focuses on improving quality of care by:
a. Providing an environment for optimal growth and development
b. Focusing on curing childhood illnesses
c. Addressing problems caused by communicable disease
d. Improving sanitation

 

 

ANS:   A

Pediatric nursing is now focused on providing an environment for optimal growth and development. Sanitation has improved. Communicable diseases and other illnesses have mostly been eradicated or controlled by immunizations, prenatal care, and antibiotics.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 1             OBJ:    4

TOP:    Evolution of Child Care                     KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. Emergency preparedness training:
a. Is not carried out by nurses
b. Is not necessary in today’s society
c. Is necessary because of the threat of war, terrorism, or disaster
d. Is considered traumatic for children

 

 

ANS:   C

Emergency preparedness training is carried out by nurses. It is necessary in today’s society, due to the increased occurrence of severe weather events, heightened terrorism threats, and war. Preparing children for emergencies helps lessen the traumatic effect of the event.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 4-5        OBJ:    5

TOP:    Emergency Preparedness                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. A family that is caring for a disabled child at home often needs help accessing a network of services. This need is best met by a:
a. Pediatric nurse practitioner
b. Case manager
c. School nurse
d. Hospice counselor

 

 

ANS:   A

The case manager oversees a continuum of care for patients and helps them to access and coordinate needed services.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 10           OBJ:    6

TOP:    Health Care Delivery Settings           KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A child has been diagnosed with a terminal illness. The child will need additional services and support after the discharge. Which health care delivery setting will provide the child with the most appropriate services?
a. Home health care
b. Hospice
c. Parish nursing
d. Clinic

 

 

ANS:   B

Home care focuses on delivering care to restore the child. Hospice provides care for the dying child. Parish nursing focuses on health promotion and may be able to provide the parents with support following the death of the child. The clinic setting provides preventive and curative care for the child.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Pages 9-10      OBJ:    8

TOP:    Health Care Delivery Settings           KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial and Physiological Integrity

 

  1. Today a child in your clinic has been diagnosed with asthma. The parents tell you that the child was planning on attending summer camp. The parents do not want to send their child to camp while he is learning to control the asthma. You tell the parents that:
a. The child cannot attend camp until his asthma is controlled
b. A home care nurse can visit the child at camp
c. There are organized camps for children with asthma
d. They will have to arrange for a private duty nurse to see him at camp

 

 

ANS:   C

Camps for children with asthma are available. The camps are staffed with nurses and other health care professionals that can care for and monitor the child while at camp. Home care nurses do not routinely see clients at camps. A private duty nurse would not be necessary at an asthma camp.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 11           OBJ:    8

TOP:    Health Care Delivery Settings           KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. A clinic nurse in an immigrant community has observed that some children have small burned areas on their skin. One child has a burn that has become infected. On exploration, the nurse learns that the burns are applied as a folk remedy for temper tantrums. What is the nurse’s most appropriate initial response?
a. Tell the parents that this type of treatment is ignorant
b. Ask the family if the treatment has been effective
c. Report the family to Child Protective Services
d. Explain the legal consequences of this behavior

 

 

ANS:   D

The parents are using a remedy that has been acceptable in their culture. The nurse must show respect for their culture, but still help the parents to understand that the remedy is not acceptable in this country and could have legal consequences. The next step would be to discuss other options for managing children’s temper tantrums.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 7             OBJ:    7

TOP:    Cultural and Religious Considerations

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial and Physiological Integrity

 

  1. Which of the following regulates working conditions for children under age 18?
a. Children’s Charter
b. Medicaid and Youth Project
c. Children’s Health Insurance Program
d. Fair Labor Standards Act

 

 

ANS:   D

The Fair Labor Standards Act regulates working conditions for children under age 18. It is the only option that specifically addresses employment.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 1             OBJ:    2

TOP:    Evolution of Child Health                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. The nurse is caring for a patient from a culture not common to the local area. The family demonstrates practices that seem unusual to the nurse and other staff. The appropriate way the nurse can interact with the patient and family is to:
a. Be respectful and open-minded when discussing beliefs
b. Explain that the child must be cared for in ways that differ from their practices
c. Insist that the family changes their beliefs
d. Speak to the family in the language used most commonly by the staff, so that the family can learn the language.

 

 

ANS:   A

Families and patients of any culture should be shown respect regardless of how unusual their practices may seem. The nurse should care for the child is ways that do not interfere with the family’s own beliefs. Patient and family beliefs can seldom be changed. The nurse should discover what language the family speaks most frequently.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 6             OBJ:    7

TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment     MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. Nurses in a pediatric practice can prepare families for emergencies by:
a. Teaching parents CPR
b. Instructing parents to have a list of emergency phone numbers
c. Instructing parents to have an out-of-state point of contact
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

All of these interventions will help parents be prepared for emergencies.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 5             OBJ:    5

TOP:    Emergency Preparedness                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. The nurse in a pediatric clinic notices that a child in the waiting area has begun to experience shortness of breath. The nurse brings him back for immediate attention. The nurse was performing which of the following roles:
a. Anticipatory guidance
b. Triage
c. Case management
d. Evidence-based practice

 

 

ANS:   B

Anticipatory guidance and case management are other roles. Evidence-based practice is a philosophy.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 9             OBJ:    6

TOP:    Health Care Delivery Settings           KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

MATCHING

 

Match the following maternal-child health programs with their purposes:

a. Social Security
b. Children and Youth Project
c. State Children’s Health Insurance Program
d. Comprehensive Child Immunization Act
e. National School Lunch Act and Child Nutrition Act

 

 

  1. Provides health care coverage for children in families that earn too much for Medicaid but cannot afford private insurance

 

  1. Targets low-income children and children in areas with poor access to health care

 

  1. Provides free or reduced meals to low-income families

 

  1. Provides state and federal funds for maternal-child care and for children with disabilities

 

  1. Ensures that children in the United States are protected against vaccine-preventable diseases at the earliest age possible

 

  1. ANS:   C                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning         MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. ANS:   B                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning         MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. ANS:   E                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning         MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. ANS:   A                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning         MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. ANS:   D                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning         MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Nurses can examine research literature, analyze important evidence, and improve the quality of patient care by applying the philosophy of

 

ANS:

Evidence-based practice

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 6             OBJ:    1

TOP:    Current Practice                                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

 

  1. List three causes of emotional and behavioral problems in children.

 

ANS:

School failure

Violence

Substance abuse

Risky sexual behavior

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 3             OBJ:    3

TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment     MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. List three factors that contribute to childhood morbidity.

 

ANS:

General health

Socioeconomic Status

Access to health care

Psychosocial factors

Homelessness

Poverty

Daycare

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 3             OBJ:    3

TOP:    Changes in Mortality and Morbidity

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. List three of the Healthy People 2010 objectives.

 

ANS:

Promotion of health behaviors

Promotion of healthy and safe communities

Improvement of systems for personal and public health

Prevention and reduction of diseases and disorders

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 4             OBJ:    4

TOP:    Health Promotion                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Price: Pediatric Nursing, 10th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 3: Care of the Hospitalized Child

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Kaylee is 6 years old. She will require hospitalization for correction of a bowel obstruction. She could be hospitalized in a(n):
a. Pediatric hospital
b. A general hospital that admits children
c. The pediatric unit of a general hospital
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

A child could be admitted to any of these settings.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 23           OBJ:    2

TOP:    The Hospital Setting                          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. Kaylee has a favorite shirt she would like to wear. Your understanding of the hospital setting helps you understand that:
a. Wearing her own clothes will make her feel more comfortable
b. Wearing her own clothes will present an infection control problem
c. Wearing her own clothes will make caring for the child more difficult
d. Wearing her own clothes will not be permitted

 

 

ANS:   A

Allowing the child to wear her own clothes helps to bridge the gap between home and hospital. Wearing clothes from home should not pose an infection control problem. The nurse can assess the clothing and determine if this is a risk.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 23           OBJ:    3

TOP:    The Hospital Setting                          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Kaylee has had her surgery and needs to have a dressing change. You expect that this procedure may be both painful and frightening to the child. This procedure should be performed:
a. In the patient’s room, because the surroundings are familiar
b. In the treatment room, so she will associate positive feelings with her patient room
c. In the playroom, so she will be distracted by the other children playing
d. None of the above

 

 

ANS:   B

Painful and frightening procedures are accomplished in the treatment room. The child needs to feel safe and secure in the patient room. Performing the procedure in front of other children is inappropriate.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Synthesis                REF:    Page 23           OBJ:    2

TOP:    The Hospital Setting                          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. Playrooms are included in most pediatric departments. The purpose of the playroom is:
a. To provide a safe place for the children to go when the nurses take a break
b. To provide an incentive for patients to choose this hospital
c. To provide play therapy, which will alleviate some of the stress the child is experiencing
d. To determine if the child is well enough for discharge

 

 

ANS:   C

Playrooms provide a place for children to play. Many units include a play therapist.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 23           OBJ:    2

TOP:    The Hospital Setting                          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. A 2-year-old patient is on a pediatric unit. The child’s mother leaves the unit for a few hours. When the child realizes the mother is gone, the child protests loudly, watches the door, and then resumes crying. The child is in which of the following stages of separation:
a. Despair
b. Denial
c. Protest
d. Depression

 

 

ANS:   C

The child is in the protest stage. Depression is not a stage of separation.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 24           OBJ:    4

TOP:    The Child’s Reaction to Hospitalization

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment     MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Matthew is 7 years old. He is scheduled to have surgery next week. The nurses on the unit offer to give Matthew and his parents a tour of the unit. This is:
a. Correct, because it will allow the parents to meet the people that will be taking care of their child
b. Incorrect, because it will overwhelm and frighten the child
c. Incorrect, because it will be an infection control risk
d. Correct, because the parents will not be allowed to stay with the child

 

 

ANS:   A

A prehospitalization tour or class will help to alleviate the anxiety of the parent and the child. The child will have his parents with him during the tour. It will not be an infection control risk. The parents will be encouraged to stay with the child.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 28           OBJ:    5

TOP:    The Family’s Reaction to Hospitalization

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A new patient has been admitted to the pediatric unit. The nurse is about to meet the patient and his family. The nurse:
a. Towers over the child to show she is in charge
b. Shows warmth and friendliness to the child and family
c. Should be detached and very formal
d. Hurries through the interview to lessen the stress on the child

 

 

ANS:   B

The nurse will greet the child at eye level. Towering over the child is frightening. The nurse should be warm and friendly. The nurse should be calm and unhurried when talking with the child and family.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Synthesis                REF:    Page 29           OBJ:    5

TOP:    Admission Process                             KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. In pediatric nursing, what is the focus of the nursing process?
a. Child
b. Family
c. Both A and B
d. None of the above

 

 

ANS:   C

In pediatric nursing, both the child and the family are the focus.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 29           OBJ:    6

TOP:    Critical Thinking and the Nursing Process

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. You are performing a review of systems on an 8-month-old infant. The infant is awake and calm. What would be the best way to begin this exam?
a. Perform the most distressing part of the exam first
b. Examine the heart, lungs, and bowel sounds
c. Perform the rectal temperature first
d. Look at the patient’s chart to see what was done first on the previous shift.

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 31

OBJ:    7                      TOP:    Systems Review

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment     MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. When auscultating the heart of a 3-year-old girl, you hear an irregular heart beat. You understand that:
a. This is normal for a child under age 4
b. The heart should have a regular rhythm
c. This may be caused by anxiety and should be rechecked in 1 hour
d. This should be rechecked on the following shift

 

 

ANS:   B

A child of 3 should have a regular rhythm. An irregular heart rhythm should be reported to the nurse in charge immediately.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 31           OBJ:    7

TOP:    Systems Review                                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. When monitoring an infant’s pulse, the nurse on the pediatric unit should know that:
a. The normal pulse rate is higher for infants than adults
b. An apical pulse is recommended for infants
c. The nurse should listen for any irregularities in rhythm
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

The normal pulse rate for an infant is much higher than an adult. The apical pulse is most recommended. Always listen for irregularities in rhythm.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 31-32    OBJ:    8

TOP:    Vital Signs      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. The nurse is assessing the respirations of an infant on the pediatric unit. The nurse knows that which of the following is true:
a. Respirations are counted by observing the movement of the abdominal wall
b. The rate is counted for thirty 30 seconds and then multiplied by 2
c. After 1 year of age, respirations should be measured in the same way as for an adult
d. Respirations are counted by observing the movement of the chest wall

 

 

ANS:   A

Infants are abdominal breathers, so the nurse should watch the movement of the abdominal wall. The rate should be counted for a full minute, because respirations tend to be irregular in infancy. Respirations are measured the same way as an adult after the child reaches 7 years of age.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 32           OBJ:    8

TOP:    Vital Signs      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. The normal respiratory rate for a 6- to 12-month-old is:
a. 14-22
b. 12-18
c. 20-25
d. 24-40

 

 

ANS:   D

The normal rate for an infant age 6-12 months is 24-40.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 32           OBJ:    8

TOP:    Vital Signs      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. An infant is admitted to your unit. You are required to weigh each infant on admission. You understand that this is required because:
a. You cannot trust the information given by the parents
b. The weight was not recorded in the emergency department
c. The weight is necessary in determining dosage of medications
d. The weight may not have been measured by a nurse at the doctor’s office

 

 

ANS:   C

The weight is necessary for determining the dosage of medications. An infant’s weight changes quickly, and the dosage must be accurate. It is crucial for the nurse to take new measurements to ensure accuracy.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 34           OBJ:    9

TOP:    Measurements                                    KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. When weighing an infant, the nurse should:
a. Weigh the baby naked
b. Provide a warm room
c. Keep a hand on the infant to prevent falls
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

The baby should be weighed naked for accuracy. The room should be warm because the baby is unclothed. The baby is at risk for falling, so the nurse should keep a hand on the baby at all times.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 34-36    OBJ:    9

TOP:    Measurements                                    KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. The nurse is caring for a 6-month-old infant. The safety of the infant can best be ensured by which of the following safety measures:
a. Prop nursing bottles carefully
b. Provide supervision to children playing with wheelchairs
c. Place crib away from electrical outlets
d. Ensure the tray is securely locked before leaving a child unattended in a high chair

 

 

ANS:   C

Bottles should never be propped. Children should not be allowed to play with wheelchairs. The crib should always be placed away from electrical outlets to prevent child from placing objects or fingers into the outlet. Never leave a child unattended in a high chair.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 37           OBJ:    11

TOP:    Safety             KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. A 6-year-old is going home today. She is newly diagnosed with Type I diabetes. Her parents have been taught how to manage her disease, but the nurse is concerned that they may not remember everything that was taught. The nurse can best help the parents by:
a. Instructing the parents that they can bring their child back to the unit for additional help as needed
b. Beginning discharge planning as soon as the order for discharge has been written by the attending physician
c. Providing the family with written instructions regarding diet, medications, activity, and procedures needed by the child
d. Delaying informing the parents of the impending discharge to prevent stress and anxiety for the parents and child

 

 

ANS:   C

Parents cannot bring their child back to the unit as needed. Discharge planning should begin as soon as the patient is admitted. Providing written instructions about all aspects of care will reinforce teaching and provide an important resource for the parents. The parents need to be informed of discharge as soon as possible so that they can begin making arrangements and can prepare for departure.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Synthesis                REF:    Pages 30-31    OBJ:    10

TOP:    Discharge Planning

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation and Evaluation

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. A child is admitted with an infectious disease. He is placed in an isolation room. In order to assess this child you should:
a. Use your own stethoscope and wipe thoroughly with antiseptic after use
b. Use a stethoscope reserved for this patient and kept on the unit
c. Use a sterile stethoscope each time the patient is assessed
d. Remove the used equipment each day for disinfection

 

 

ANS:   B

A patient in isolation will have equipment for daily care placed on the unit. A sterile stethoscope is not needed. Equipment is kept in the unit until the patient is discharged. Removing the equipment daily will increase exposure risk to others.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Pages 39-40    OBJ:    12

TOP:    Preventing the Transmission of Infection

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. A child in isolation is not permitted to go to the playroom. The child would like to play and requests toys from the playroom. You explain:
a. He cannot have any toys because they would have to be thrown away
b. He can have washable toys because they can be disinfected
c. He will not feel like playing because he is sick
d. He should have brought toys from home if he wanted to play

 

 

ANS:   B

The child can have toys when in isolation. The toys must be washable. Children need to play, even when they are sick. Children do not have to bring their own toys to play.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 40           OBJ:    12

TOP:    Preventing the Transmission of Infection

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. A 7-year-old is scheduled for surgery by her physician. The child is not hospitalized before the surgery. In order to prepare a child for surgery, the nurse should:
a. Encourage the parents to bring their child to a preoperative tour and class
b. Instruct the parents to wait until the day of surgery to tell the child about it
c. Tell the child that he or she will be put to sleep and will not feel anything
d. Give the needed explanations to the parents and have the parents give explanations to the child

 

 

ANS:   A

Parents should be encouraged to bring their children to a preoperative class and tour. This reduces stress on both parent and child. Parents should tell the child a few days in advance to give the child time to prepare. Not informing the child before the event will diminish trust. Telling children that they will be put to sleep may frighten them, since this is a phrase often used to explain death of a pet. The nurse should explain procedures to the parents and the child.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 41           OBJ:    13

TOP:    Implications of Pediatric Surgery      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Shamika is 5 years old. She had surgery yesterday. In order to evaluate her pain the nurse will:
a. Expect the child to complain if she is in pain
b. Observe for verbal and nonverbal cues that she is in pain
c. Give pain medication if the child is crying
d. Ask the child to rate her pain on a scale of 1 to 10

 

 

ANS:   B

Children do not always complain if they are in pain. They are frightened by the events and their surroundings. The nurse should evaluate for both verbal and non verbal cues of pain. Children may not always cry if they are in pain. Conversely, they may be crying for another reason. Children at this age cannot rate their pain in this way. The nurse would use a pictorial pain scale.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 41           OBJ:    14

TOP:    The Child in Pain                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

MATCHING

 

Match the following terms with their definition:

a. Critical thinking
b. Nursing Outcomes Classification
c. Critical pathways

 

 

  1. A nursing language that facilitates communication, data collection, and prioritizing of patient care

 

  1. Convert outcomes for a problem into actions necessary to achieve the outcomes

 

  1. An expanded, systematic way of thinking

 

  1. ANS:   B                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Pages 29-30

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Critical Thinking and the Nursing Process

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. ANS:   C                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Pages 29-30

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Critical Thinking and the Nursing Process

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. ANS:   A                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Pages 29-30

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Critical Thinking and the Nursing Process

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Critical thinking uses all of the concepts listed below except:

Processing

Inquiry

Criticism

Reasoning

Criticism

Creativity

Ingenuity

 

ANS:

Criticism

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 29           OBJ:    6

TOP:    Nursing Process                                  KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Evaluation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safe and Effective Care Environment

 

  1. A patient in an isolation room is experiencing projectile vomiting. In order to assist this patient, list the personal protective equipment that the nurse should don:

 

ANS:

Gloves

Mask

Gown

Protective eye wear

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 40-41    OBJ:    12

TOP:    Preventing the Spread of Infection    KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Safety and Infection Control

 

  1. List five nursing implementations that can help relieve the stressors of hospitalization.

 

ANS:

Explain all procedures

Be honest

Encourage parents to stay with the child

Maintain the routine of home

Encourage parents to bring a familiar object from home

Perform all invasive treatments in the exam room

Provide a consistent caretaker, when possible

Provide comfort to the child after traumatic procedures

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 25           OBJ:    3

TOP:    The Child’s Reaction to Hospitalization

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychological Integrity

 

  1. A method for children to act out situations that are part of their hospital experience:

 

ANS:

Dramatic play

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 26           OBJ:    3

TOP:    The Child’s Reaction to Hospitalization

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

Price: Pediatric Nursing, 10th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 11: The Preschool Child

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. A 6-year old child comes to the clinic for an annual physical. The nurse weighs the child and finds his weight to be 32 lb (14.5 kg).The nurse reviews his previous measurements to determine if this weight is acceptable. The nurse understands that:
a. Because the child weighed 18 lb at 1 year of age, this weight is acceptable
b. Because the child weighed 20 lb at 1 year of age, this weight is higher than expected
c. Because the child weighed 16 lb at 1 year of age, this weight is normal
d. Because the child weighed 24 lb at 1 year of age, this weight is normal

 

 

ANS:   C

At the age of 6, a child’s weight should be double the 1-year weight.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 220         OBJ:    2

TOP:    General Characteristics and Development

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. A 3-year-old child is admitted to the pediatric unit. When planning the care for this child, the nurse remembers which of the following characteristics of a child this age:
a. A 3-year-old is less fearful than an infant
b. A 3-year-old is not afraid of crossing the street
c. A 3-year-old is afraid of bodily harm
d. A 3-year-old can play cooperatively for long periods of time

 

 

ANS:   C

A 3-year-old has more worries than an infant. A child this age plays cooperatively for a short period of time. Three-year-olds understand that a car can injure them, which makes them fearful of crossing streets. The fear of bodily harm is very strong in children of this age.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 223         OBJ:    2

TOP:    The Three-Year-Old Child                 KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. A 4-year-old child asks her parent what dying means. A child this age:
a. Normally does not ask about death
b. Should be given a detailed explanation
c. May view death as a kind of sleep
d. Should be discouraged from discussing this topic

 

 

ANS:   C

Children at this age are just beginning to wonder about death. They are not able to fully comprehend it. Children should be given very basic explanations. Allow the child to discuss the topic in a general way. Children often view dying as a type of sleep.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Pages 224-225

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    The Four-Year-Old Child

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A 5-year-old child enjoys normal play and activities appropriate for his age. His parents are concerned about keeping their child safe and in promoting normal growth and development. The parents should be instructed to:
a. Provide the child with detailed direction for play
b. Continually remind the child to be careful
c. Provide constant admonition for failures
d. Allow the child to learn to complete tasks on his own.

 

 

ANS:   D

Children need to be allowed to develop their imaginations. Overdirection of play can also leave the child feeling insecure. The child should be reminded of the rules, but should not be continually told to be careful. The child should be allowed to complete tasks on his own.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 225         OBJ:    2

TOP:    The Five-Year-Old Child                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The nurse is preparing to teach a discipline class for parents of preschoolers. The nurse will be guided by the following principles:
a. Discipline and punishment are the same
b. Punishment includes all methods that are used to change behavior
c. Punishment is a specific procedure that is used to decrease an unwanted behavior
d. Discipline is threatening to a child’s well-being

 

 

ANS:   C

Discipline and punishment are not the same. “Discipline includes all methods used to change behavior”; punishment is used to decrease unwanted behavior. Discipline provides structure and security in a child’s life.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 225         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Guiding the Preschool Child              KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The nurse plans to emphasize which of the following guidelines in her presentation:
a. Setting limits will make children feel secure
b. Establish rules for safety by 2 years of age
c. Constant criticism will help bring about the desired change in behavior
d. Yelling will help get the child’s attention

 

 

ANS:   A

Setting limits makes the child feel secure. Rules for safety should be established by 8 months of age. Constant criticism will generate resentment and insecurity. Parents should not resort to yelling.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Pages 225-226

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Guiding the Preschool Child

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Parents bring their 5-year-old to the clinic because the child has begum wetting the bed after having been potty-trained for 2 years. The parents and child are very upset. Which of the following responses by the nurse would be most appropriate?
a. “Don’t worry, the doctor can prescribe some medication to make it go away”
b. “Your child is suffering from an emotional problem”
c. “Please tell me when this started and any events that led up to this problem”
d. “If you discipline your child, this will go away”

 

 

ANS:   C

Medications cannot make enuresis go away. There is insufficient evidence to assume the child has an emotional problem. The parents should not be criticized, because this is not a discipline problem. The nurse asks questions to discern the recent history of the event.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 228         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Enuresis          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. A mother expressed concern that her 3-year-old will be jealous of the new baby when it arrives. Which of the following suggestions by the nurse would be helpful in this situation?
a. Allow the child to help care for the infant
b. Tell the child that the baby’s needs will come first
c. Encourage the child to think of the baby as a pet
d. Punish any regressive behavior

 

 

ANS:   A

The child should be allowed to help the mother care for the infant. The child feels that the baby will come first, and needs to understand that he or she is still important. A child of this age may view the baby as a pet, rather than a person. This is not encouraged. The child may display regressive behavior to help cope. This should not be punished.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 230         OBJ:    3

TOP:    Jealously and Sibling Rivalry             KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A 3-year-old enjoys sucking her thumb at nap time. The nurse advises the parent that:
a. Thumb-sucking will deform the mouth
b. Thumb-sucking is instinctive and normal
c. Thumb-sucking will harm deciduous teeth
d. Thumb-sucking indicates the child is insecure

 

 

ANS:   B

Thumb-sucking is normal, instinctive behavior at this age. This will not harm the teeth as long as it goes away before the second teeth erupt.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 227         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Thumb-Sucking                                  KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Parents ask the nurse for suggestions in selecting a preschool for their 4-year-old. The nurse recommends:
a. A school that requires quiet play and study
b. A school that provides room to run and shout
c. A school that does not encourage emotional expression
d. A school that has rigid rules about play

 

 

ANS:   B

Children need room to run and shout. At the age of 4, they are not ready to sit quietly and study all day. Children need freedom of expression and freedom to choose how to play, as long as they are safe.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 230         OBJ:    3

TOP:    Preschool        KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Select the statement about play that is true:
a. Play is not important for children that are sick
b. Play does not have any educational value
c. Play provides entertainment only and has no developmental value
d. Play provides a method for the nurse to establish rapport with a hospitalized child

 

 

ANS:   D

Play is very important to the health and well-being of a child. Play can assist the child in development and provide educational experiences. The nurse can have an excellent opportunity to establish rapport with the child through play.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 230         OBJ:    4

TOP:    Value of Play                                     KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Parents should select a school with the following characteristics:
a. Has a small number of children per teacher
b. Has an adequate physical facility
c. Encourages parents to drop in anytime
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

A preschool should include all of the above characteristics

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 230         OBJ:    3

TOP:    Preschool        KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The nurse is planning care for a preschool child. The nurse would like to provide an opportunity for the child to play. Which of the following factors will guide the appropriate selection of an activity?
a. The state of health
b. Activity limitation
c. The developmental level
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   D

All factors listed will guide the nurse in determining appropriate play activities for the child.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 231         OBJ:    4

TOP:    Value of Play                                     KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. The nurse would select which of the following toys for a preschool child that is at the expected developmental level:
a. Rattle
b. Crayons
c. Books for self-reading
d. Cradle gym

 

 

ANS:   B

A child of normal development at the preschool age would not be interested in a rattle or a cradle gym. Crayons allow the child to express himself or herself and engage in imaginative play. Most children at this age cannot read.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 232         OBJ:    5

TOP:    Choosing Toys                                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Planning

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A preschool child is recovering from cardiac surgery. The nurse would recommend which of the following toys:
a. Jump rope
b. Large beads and string
c. Skateboard
d. Rocking horse

 

 

ANS:   B

A child recovering from cardiac surgery will not be able to jump rope for a while. Quiet games will be required.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 232         OBJ:    5

TOP:    Choosing Toys                                   KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A child refuses to tell the nurse how he is doing or if he is in pain. The nurse asks the child to draw a picture of how he feels because:
a. This will both entertain and distract the child
b. This allows the nurse to assess his fears
c. This will demonstrate to the parent that their child is functioning normally
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:   B

Children often deal with their stressors through play. The nurse will look at the drawing and use this to assess fears. The child may also say something about the drawing that will give the nurse clues to what the child is feeling. The ability to draw a picture will not indicate that the child is functioning normally, just that the child is able to accomplish this task.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analysis                  REF:    Page 233         OBJ:    4

TOP:    Other Aspects of Play                                    KEY:              Nursing Process Step: Application

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Which of the following statements about preschoolers and injuries is correct?
a. Preschool children no longer need a car seat
b. Accidents are a major threat to children at this age
c. Preschool children no longer need a bike helmet
d. Preschool children can safely handle possibly dangerous items

 

 

ANS:   B

Children continue to use a car seat or a booster seat at this age. Accidents remain the major cause of death and disability at this age. Any person riding a bike should wear a helmet. Preschoolers should never be given a potentially dangerous item to carry.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application             REF:    Page 234         OBJ:    6

TOP:    Injury Prevention                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Preschool children should be taught the following about strangers:
a. Do not accept a ride from a stranger
b. A stranger is someone who is odd-looking
c. It is okay to talk to a stranger as long as that person stays in the car
d. Children should be careful when playing in a lonely location

 

 

ANS:   A

Children should be taught to never accept a ride from a stranger. Strangers may look normal. If a stranger talks to a child from a car, the child should be taught to yell and run. Children should be taught to never play in a lonely location.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 234         OBJ:    6

TOP:    Injury Prevention                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. In order to prevent poisoning, parents of preschoolers should be instructed to:
a. Label poisons when put in household containers
b. Continue to keep medications out of reach
c. Tell children which items are poisonous
d. Rely on childproof lids to prevent access to medication

 

 

ANS:   B

Poisons should never be put in household containers. Labeling will not help children this age, because they cannot read. Medications should still be kept out of reach. The parent should not rely solely on the childproof lids to keep the children from obtaining access to the medication.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 234         OBJ:    6

TOP:    Injury Prevention                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Preschool children engage in preoperational thinking. This means that:
a. Children cannot think in terms of operations
b. Children no longer believe in magical powers
c. Children base their reasoning on what is implied
d. Children no longer demonstrate symbolic functioning

 

 

ANS:   A

Children at this age are not able to think in terms of operations. Children believe in magical powers and base their reasoning on what they can see and hear.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 220-221

OBJ:    2                      TOP:    Theories of Development

KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment     MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

MATCHING

 

Match the terms with their definitions:

a. Egocentrism
b. Animism
c. Centering
d. Artificialism

 

 

  1. Attributes life to inanimate objects

 

  1. Tendency to concentrate on a single outstanding characteristic or an object

 

  1. Inability to see any point of view but one’s own

 

  1. The world and everything in it is created by human beings

 

  1. ANS:   B                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 220-222

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Key Terms      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. ANS:   C                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 220-222

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Key Terms      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. ANS:   A                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 220-222

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Key Terms      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. ANS:   D                     DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Pages 220-222

OBJ:    1                      TOP:    Key Terms      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. The inability to see any viewpoint but one’s own is called:

 

ANS:

Egocentrism

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Knowledge             REF:    Page 220         OBJ:    1

TOP:    Key Terms      KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Assessment

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Define the two types of enuresis.

 

ANS:

Primary enuresis—bedwetting in a child that has never been dry

Secondary enuresis—bedwetting in a child that has been dry for 1 year or more

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 228         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Enuresis          KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Comprehension

MSC:   NCLEX: Physiological Integrity

 

  1. List three alternative methods of discipline that the nurse can teach the parents to use.

 

ANS:

Time out

Consistency

Modeling

Timing

Withholding privileges

Rewarding good behavior

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 226         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Timing, Time Out                               KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity

 

ESSAY

 

  1. List at least three reasons why parents should be encouraged to stop spanking their children.

 

ANS:

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents use an alternative method

Spanking has been proven to be no more effective than other means of punishment

Spanking can have negative consequences for both parent and child

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension       REF:    Page 226         OBJ:    2

TOP:    Spanking         KEY:   Nursing Process Step: Implementation

MSC:   NCLEX: Psychosocial Integrity